Cool Science Experiments

Everyone loves a cool science experiment, right?  Well, if you are looking for a cool science experiment, here are a few ideas to get you started.

Frozen bubbles.  That is right, you can make bubbles last for a long time.  This can be really fun for the younger age group.   Baking soda bubbles is also a neat experiment for the bubble enthusiast.

Animal experiments are always fun.  How does variation in temperature affect animals?  Do animals have a color preference?  Are bugs or animals deterred by certain sounds? 

Food always makes for a cool experiment.  Some ideas include making light with fruit, plastic mild, moldy bred, and yeast.  You can also make your own butter in a jar and rock candy.  While you are considering the food category, why not do an experiment to see how much fat is in the food that you eat.

Balloons make interesting experiments as well, and there are so many things that you can do with them.  Some of the options include; balloon blast off, balloon car, balloon boat, straws and balloons, and balloon columns. 

Some other neat miscellaneous experiments include; how water pressure works, using food coloring to change to color of certain flowers, and homemade silly putty. 

Nature enthusiasts could try making their own little green house in a bottle.  You may also want to consider making a fossil for your science project.

There are countless other cool science experiments out there; it just takes a little research to discover the perfect one for your student.

Check out the science kits that can help you get started on your experiment today.

Photo source: Archytos

Middle School Science Fair Projects

I am sure all of the parents out there can remember the big science fair from middle school.  Well, children today have the same privilege of participating in the ever famous science fair.  The question for parents is what project should your child do?

There are several projects that are well suited for a middle school science fair, and the good news is that they can be interesting and fun.  The first step is to sit down with your child and make a list of projects and ideas that they find interesting.  From the list decide which ones are the appropriate grade level.  Next begins the research, which is not as daunting as it may seem.  Below are a few examples of science fair projects that work well for middle school students.

If you have a child who does not like to get dirty, use that to your advantage when deciding on a project.  You could study the effects of different soaps and antibacterial hand sanitizers on bacteria.  You could also compare the effectiveness of different disinfectants against bacteria.  Studying the effects of antibiotics on bacteria is also an option, experiment to see if they become immune if they are exposed repeatedly.

For a child who doesn’t mind a little dirt you could always go with a nature experiment.  Set up an experiment to find out the effects of different PH levels on plants.  You could also study the effects of water and sun on plants.  For a really neat experiment you could set up an experiment to find the effects of gravity on plant seedlings.

Check out 24 Hour Science Projects

today and get your science experiments!

photo source: eieio1948

Five Types of Science Projects

It it just me who thinks that science projects were easier in grade school? Back then, you could turn in a replica of a volcano, a coke bottle that spews, or just a science report on plants. In middle school, everthing changes. Middle School science teachers want creative ideas, specific project elements, in depth research, and detailed logs of the whole science fair process. They talk about stuff like independent variables and control groups.

Finding a middle school science project that lives up to our teachers expectations has always been a challenge for our family. We were required to do an experiment based, investigative project for the science fair. There are five types of science projects, but most internet sites and books had projects that were actually demonstrations or models. It’s very important that you read the directions from your teacher and/or the science fair, and make sure that the project your child chooses fits into the right category – especially in middle school.
Bald Egg Science Project
Here are the five types of projects.

1. Investigative projects – Most science fairs require students to submit an investigative science project. This type of project has an experiment that tests an hypothesis. The experiment will follow the scientific method, and may require a control group. (If you’re unfamiliar with this vocabulary, check out the free resource below!)

An example of an investigative project would be “How does salt affect the boiling point of water?” This can easily be tested by our experiment which adds different amounts of salt to water and recording the temperature at which it boils.

If you see the words experiment, scientific method, control and/or variable on the project instructions, you’ll probably need an investigative project. As mentioned before, they’re not easy to find. (Hint: We’ve got a whole pack of investigative projects at 24 Hour Science Projects…)

2. Demonstration projects – In this type of project a student demonstrate a scientific principle, and lots of time the teacher wants it presented in front of the class as an oral report. There is no true experiment performed, because there won’t be a control or different variables.

3. Research project – Basically this is a science report. Students research a topic, and write what they discovered. Any type of science topic can be used for a research project.

4. Models – For a model project, models are built to explain a scientific principle or structure.

5. Collections – In this type of project a collection of objects is displayed to give an overview of a topic. An example would be a rock collection or a display showing pictures of various animals in a specific family.

Every middle school science fair will have slightly different criteria for projects. As you search for a project, make sure it’s the type of project your school requires. If you need help, check out “The Non-Scientist Parent’s Guide to Science Fair Projects“, which has guides for all the different types of science projects – including the experiment based ones! There is a vocabulary list that gives simple definitions to those vocabulary words you learned in middle school, but promptly forgot.

Believe it or not, science projects are designed to help students learn about science. Figure out which type of project your school requires, and you’ll be one step closer to showing your child how much fun science can be!

Find all sorts of science projects with our excellent guides, including middle school science projects.