Where to Find Science Experiments for Kids on the Internet

The internet can be a great way to engage an energetic and inquisitive kid in doing an at-home science experiment. In some cases, your child’s school might require the completion of a science project as part of their curriculum. Whatever their age, looking for science experiments on the internet might be your most useful tool.

You can easily search online and find databases of detailed science projects for kids, especially if you narrow the search by being a bit more specific. For example, if your child is studying or is interested in earth sciences, a search for “kid’s science experiments, earth science” might yield projects about earthquakes, erosion models, or studies of how fossils are made.

You can also search more generally for science experiment databases like those found at http://www.akronlibrary.org/DBS/SFDB/Default.aspx or http://www.youth.net/nsrc/sci/sci.index.html, where you can search a massive inventory of science experiments with more specific parameters like the grade your child is in, the type of experiment, or field of science. If you don’t have time to browse through too large a database, a great sure bet is the science project guide at http://www.24hourscienceprojects.com/guide.pdf, a wonderful resource for finding kids science experiments on the internet. 24 Hour Science Projects are also great as they come complete with the entire topic headers typically used in school science projects such as purpose, hypothesis, procedure, observations, results, and conclusion. 

No matter what your child’s specific interests, you are sure to be able to find a great experiment for them to have fun doing and hopefully learn a great deal from as well. 

Visit 24 Hour Science Projects

today to get your science experiment!

When You have Two Kids’ Science Projects – at the Same Time

What do you when you have two kids’ science projects – at the same time? Science Projects for families with more than one child can be an daunting task for parents. Science fairs are generally held at about the same time, so even if kids are in different schools, their projects probably have due dates that are near each other. Here are four ideas to simplify the process.

What do you when more than one of your kids has a science project?! Science Projects for families with more than one child can be an daunting task for parents. Science fairs are generally held at about the same time, so even if kids are in different schools, their projects probably have due dates that are near each other. Here are four ideas to simplify the process.

1. Let kids work together on the same project. They can each do the experiment, and will each have to do a science board or report, but you’ll only have to help find one idea and gather the materials from one list. This is the way to go if your kids are in different schools – like one in middle school and one in elementary school.

2. Use different variables for the same experiment. If you’re comparing amounts of Vitamin C in substances, for example, let one child test various canned fruit juices, and another child test different juices from fresh fruit. The research and procedure is the same, but the experiments are different. Our Middle School Science Projects package has this experiment, making this an easy choice.

3. Recycle projects. Our family has always done projects together, then saved them in the attic. One year one of our boys used the same experiment his brother had done the year before. We redid the experiment, but reused the science board, simply adding the fresh data and photographs.

4. Submit different types of the same project. If your school science fair allows it, one child can submit and experiment based project, and the other submit a demonstration. For example, one child can demonstrate how to take the shell off an egg without boiling, and another can experiment to see if water goes through the membrane.

Science projects are supposed to be wonderful learning experiences for kids – and they can be. Don’t let your family get bogged down in the process. Look for ways to streamline and coordinate, and make science fair time a fun educational time for your kids.

Kayla Fay

PS When both (or ALL!) of your kids science projects are due at the same time, pick up one of our guides. Our middle school science projects are perfect for all the ideas above. Get your middle school science projects here!

 

It’s a “Cosmetology Science Project”

Earlier this week I talked about our new science project about hair. I suppose, since we are scientists, that I need to call it a Cosmetology Science Project. Anyhow – getting this project just right has been about as difficult as getting the right hair cut for my boys. But it’s been fun! And we’ve learned all sorts of things along the way.Cosmetology Science Project

For example, we had a heck of a time getting the hair the exact length we needed it. I mean, hair is little, tiny, and hard to grasp. We figured out a way – quite by accident – to get each strand the perfect length. Our other discovery is finding out what sort of stuff is in cosmetology products. We have boys, and they don’t exactly use anything on their hair other than shampoo – and sometimes I have to remind them to use that! Anyhow, I didn’t know about peroxide and lemon juice and the difference between highlighting and stripping color. Thanks to some interviews with real cosmetologists, I’m much better informed.

Of course, we have more fun middle school projects up our sleeve. Right now my kitchen has a slight smell of sour milk and our cabinets are splattered with purple cabbage juice. I’ve got orange pulp in my fingernails, and the taste of club soda in my mouth. (I know, you’re not supposed to taste any of the experiments!)

But we’re sailing toward getting this package of products done! I can’t wait.

Kayla Fay

PS If you need a science project now, get our free Parent’s Guide to a Science Project at 24 Hour Science Projects.com!

Six Steps to a Middle School Science Project

choosing a middle school projectKids in middle school think science projects should be fun. Their teachers think they should be educational. Middle school parents just want the projects to be done fast and easy. Since students, teachers and parents are all involved in the process of getting ready for the science fair, most of the time, science projects have to be all of the above!

As a result, finding the perfect science fair project can be difficult. Here are five steps to finding a project that will make everybody happy.

1. Know what kind of science project is required. There are five kinds of projects, and many a student has had their project idea rejected because of a science technicality. Make sure you know if the science teacher requires an experimental (investigatory) project, a demonstration of a science principle, a report on a subject in science, a collection of items, or a scientific model. Most science fairs require an experiment, which has an hypothesis, tests the hypothesis following the scientific method, and arrives at a conclusion.

2. Find out what interests the student. What does your child do in her spare time? Does he ride horses, is she a soccer player? Is music a passion, or do you have a budding engineer on your hands? If a student is already interested in a subject, learning more about it will come naturally.

3. Determine the budget for time – and money. If your science fair is next week, you need to search for a fast and easy science project that can be done without ordering supplies from Outer Botswana. If you can’t afford special chemicals or science equipment, then you’ll need to focus on projects that can use materials easily found in your home.

4. Use all available resources for the science project search. Head to the library and look at the books on science projects. You can also use the internet. Go to your search engine and type “science project on vitamin C” or “science experiment on insulation”. Note, however, that many books and websites have demonstration projects instead of experiments. So, again, be careful that you find the right type of project.

5. Make a list of possible projects, and work together to choose the best one!

6. Our BEST hint:, and get a free copy of “The Non-Scientist Parent’s Guide to Science Fair Projects“. You’ll learn more about how to choose that perfect science project! Or, for five fast and easy science fair experiments that can be finished by this time tomorrow, visit 24 Hour Science Projects.

Easy Middle School Science Projects

easy science projectIt’s Friday night, and you’ve been putting it off for a month. But on Monday, your elementary student’s science project is due. And you haven’t even started. You need an easy science project that can be done quickly, but it has to be good…

It’s not an easy thing to find! Science projects that are easy often don’t meet the requirements of the teacher or the science fair. And projects that are fast often aren’t enough to teach your child anything. We know. With four boys, our family has waited until the last minute to do a science project more than once. But the good news is that there really are good – and even fun – middle school science experiments that can be done quickly and easily.

1. Find out exactly what type of project your child needs. Some elementary school teachers want a demonstration science project that the child can present to the class. Some teachers want a science report. Occasionally, scientific models or nature collections will be allowed. Most teachers, however, want an experiment based science project that follows the scientific method.

2. Ask your child for several ideas. He or she will be the scientist, after all!

3. Do an internet or library search for “science projects on…” You may find exactly what you need this way. Make a list of possible projects. Go ahead and discard projects that are on advanced chemistry.

4. Take a look at the ingredients and equipment. If there are items not readily available or are wickedly expensive, you’ll know that project isn’t for you. There are plenty of experiments that can be done with things in the home, or at the supermarket.

5. Find out how long the project takes. If it takes more than two or three days, you probably want to reconsider. The ideal easy science project will not take more than a few hours, in case something goes wrong and you have to repeat. And unfortunately, this does happen.

Although an easy science project isn’t always easy to find, you and your child can work together to find a project that is easy to do, but also educational and fun! If you need more help in finding your easy project, visit 24 Hour Science Projects.

Get Your FREE Parent’s Guide to a Science Project from

24 Hour Science Projects.